UCSB Science Line
Sponge Spicules Nerve Cells Galaxy Abalone Shell Nickel Succinate X-ray Lens Lupine
UCSB Science Line
Home
How it Works
Ask a Question
Search Topics
Webcasts
Our Scientists
Science Links
Contact Information
What is meant by Morse Code?
Answer 1:

Morse Code is a system for communicating text over long distances. Before telephones and the Internet allowed people in different locations to speak to each other, they had to rely on the electrical telegraph for near-real time communication. An operator would use a telegraph to send a series of electrical pulses to another operator's telegraph receiver. Morse Code was developed as a system of "dits" and "dahs"--short and long pulses--that could be sent via telegraph and stood for letters in the alphabet. Letter by letter, telegraph operators would translate and tap out messages in Morse Code that were received and translated back into natural human language. This system allowed people to communicate across continents and oceans almost instantly at a time when most other long-distance communication happened by mail and was considerably slower.

Morse Code is named for Samuel Morse, who was instrumental in developing the electronic telegraph system in the 1830s. You can read more about Samuel Morse, Morse Code, and the electronic telegraph here:

Morse Code

Answer 2:

Morse code is kind of like another language in which each letter or number of the alphabet or numerical system is represented by sometimes dots and dashes, or sound in which it can be a short beep or sustained tone.


Answer 3:

Morse Code is a code created by a man named Morse and was used as a form of communication back in the days in which communication was by telegraph and did not have the precision to send the density of information that modern telephone (let alone internet) can do. The code is used to take a series of clicks of different lengths and turn them into letters, which are then used to spell words and otherwise make up a language.


Answer 4:

Morse code is a way to transform letters into a series of dots and dashes, or short beeps and long beeps. That's all it is. Nowadays we send very complicated signals through many data lines, but a long time ago this was difficult, and the easiest signal to send was an "on" signal. When you connected the circuit, it beeped, and people came up with a code of long beeps and short beeps to encode different letters. Each letter has a specific combination of short and/or long beeps, and if both people communicating know the code (or combination), then messages could be sent!



Click Here to return to the search form.

University of California, Santa Barbara Materials Research Laboratory National Science Foundation
This program is co-sponsored by the National Science Foundation and UCSB School-University Partnerships
Copyright © 2015 The Regents of the University of California,
All Rights Reserved.
UCSB Terms of Use