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How far away is Earth from Saturn?
Answer 1:

Because the earth and Saturn both revolve around a common point (the Sun), the distance between earth and Saturn varies through time.

When the earth and Saturn are at conjunction, the earth-Saturn distance is 9 AU (AU means astronomical units: 1AU is 93 million miles!) Conjunction means that, if you look down from above the Sun, you see Earth and Saturn all lined up.

So, at conjunction, Saturn is 9 times 93 million miles away from Earth, or about 837 million miles away!


Answer 2:

The difference between Saturn and Earth is 792,248,270 miles! That's a lot of miles, if one where to drive a car between Earth and Saturn at a typical speed limit of 60 miles an hour that would take 550,172 days or 1507 years!

We can determine the distance between Earth and Saturn by knowing the distance from the sun to each planet.

Earth is 92,957,130 miles (or 149,600,000 kilometers) from the sun.

Saturn is 885,205,400 miles (or 1,424,599,999 kilometers) from the sun.

The distance between the Earth and Saturn is the difference between Saturn's distance from the sun and Earth's distance from the sun.

Mathematically "subtracting" is the same thing as taking the difference so let us subtract (or take the difference) between these two numbers.

Now we can write the math problem in a sentence and also in numbers. That is:

The distance between the Earth and Saturn is (is in math is the "equal" sign "=") the difference (difference in math is the subtract sign "-") between Saturn's distance from the sun (885,205,400 miles) and Earth's distance from the sun (92,957,130 miles).

885,205,400 miles - 92,957,130 miles = 792248270 miles!

That is how we determine the difference between Saturn and Earth is 792,248,270 miles.


Answer 3:

Since the planets are constantly moving along their orbital paths, it's not a meaningful question to ask what the distance between the Earth and Saturn is. A better question would be to ask what the distance of closest approach (smallest distance) between the two planets is.

One could also ask what the distance of farthest approach (largest distance) between the two planets is. With a quick search, both of these values can be found online. For the Earth and Saturn, the distance of closest approach is about 1.2 billion kilometers and the distance of farthest approach is about 2.85 billion kilometers.


Answer 4:

Earth and Saturn both orbit the sun, but at different speeds, so the distance between them is always changing. Because they orbit the same star, though, the distance between the two planets is never more than the sum of their distances from the sun, and never less than the difference between their distances from the sun.

Earth is 150 million kilometers from the sun. Saturn is roughly 1.2 billion kilometers from the sun. At third grade, you probably know enough math to figure out the maximum and minimum distances between the two planets.


Answer 5:

Saturn is the the sixth furthest planet from the Sun. It's distance from Earth technically changes every day because both planets are in orbit around the sun. When Saturn is the closest to Earth in orbit it is about 1.2 billion kilometers away. When Saturn and Earth are furthest from each other, meaning on opposite sides of the sun, Saturn is about 1.7 billion km apart.



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